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Getting ready for learning from home - advice for teachers

Key messages for teachers supporting parents and whānau

Working collaboratively with parents, whānau and their children will be really important

Your help will be important for them.

Some things to consider:

  • Identify the best way to stay connected with each other so that whānau can plan ahead.
  • Agree on regular contact times so you stay connected (potentially a message at the same time each weekday morning). This will help whānau know when new information is available.
  • Let them know an approximate timeframe on when you get back to them if they have questions (e.g. within 24 hours).
  • Give a clear outline of what you want school-age students to do over the week or fortnight and provide the supporting material (digital or physical) whānau and children need.
  • Prioritise things that you want children to do. Give simple reasons why so whānau understand what is important.

Early learning

Early learning managers and leaders

Your staff will need support when they are working from home

Things to consider include:

  • how to monitor and support staff wellbeing
  • whether you can use online forums to support your teaching teams
  • making sure all staff have links to information on emergency and pandemic planning such as the Ministries of Health and Education
  • talking with your teachers about how they will support children and whānau within your usual operating hours - make it clear to staff that they are not expected to be on call 24/7
  • talking to support staff about whether they will be able to support children at home
  • if your service is part of a Kāhui Ako you can use the strengths of the Kāhui Ako to support your teaching teams.

Helping parents and whānau

  • Parents and whānau will need your help and support. Be clear about:
    • the resources and support you can provide
    • who they contact within the teaching team
    • the best channels for contact. 
  • The Ministry will be developing advice and support material to help you. 
  • Talking with teachers, parents and whānau about your emergency management plans. They will have questions, and you need to be able to help them find answers to those questions.

Early learning teachers

Work with your colleagues and leaders to develop a plan for how you may continue to support and stay in touch with the families and whānau of children enrolled at your service. You may have ways of connecting remotely already. Things to consider include:

  • how will you support each other and manage contact with your families and whānau
  • whether you have links to appropriate sources of information on emergency and pandemic planning such as the Ministries of Health and Education
  • what information and advice you can share with parents and whānau, for example:
    • ideas and ways that learning may be extended at home using other people and things they have in the home
    • encouragement on establishing daily routines and rhythms for the day that work for both them and their children
    • building on what they already do with their children and enjoying this time to learn together and sharing activities like reading and games
    • sources of advice on keeping children safe online
    • sources of advice on the optimum amount of time to spend on devices
    • Ministry of Education advice for parents
  • agreeing with your team a management plan for when your service resumes.

Primary principals and leaders

Consider how to support your staff:

  • developing a strategy to monitor and support staff wellbeing
  • using online forums where possible to support your teaching teams.

Develop a plan with your teachers to communicate with students and whānau during school hours. That includes:

  • managing resources such as reading books, digital and other online sources
  • making it clear to staff that they are not expected to be on call 24/7
  • using the strengths of your Kāhui Ako to support your teaching teams.

Primary school teachers

Work with your colleagues and leaders to develop a learning programme for students that can be delivered remotely.

  • Agree within your teams how you will support each other and manage contact with your students and whānau.
  • If students do not have access to a device or the internet give parents guidance on options the school can provide.

Secondary principals and leaders

Work with your staff, Board and community to come up with a plan to ensure every student has opportunities to continue learning at home.

Consider the options to support students working for NCEA.

Check out NZQA website for the latest information

Consider the options for students with learning support needs.

Consider how to support your staff when they are working from home, this includes:

  • ensuring all staff have appropriate links to source of information on emergency and pandemic planning such as the Ministries of Health and Education
  • collaborating with your teachers to agree a planned programme of contact with students and whānau within school hours that includes:
    • maintaining contact with students through electronic communication where possible
    • making it clear to staff that they are not expected to be on call 24/7.

If your school is part of a Kāhui Ako use the strengths of the Kāhui Ako to support your teaching teams.

Talk with teachers, parents and whānau about your emergency management plans. They will have questions, and you need to be able to help them find answers to those questions.

Secondary school teachers

Work with your teams to develop a programme of learning for students that can be delivered remotely. Things to consider include.

  • Working with your leadership team to agree how you will support each other and manage contact with your students.
  • Ensuring you have links to appropriate sources of information on emergency management plans.

If students do not have access to a device or the internet, give parents guidance on options and the support the school can provide.